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The World's Largest Underwater Restaurant Is Finally Open, Here's A Look Inside

The World's Largest Underwater Restaurant Is Finally Open, Here's A Look Inside

The 'Under' restaurant in Norway also doubles as a research institute that studies marine biology.

We go to a lot of restaurants throughout the course of our time in a city or country, and some of them have given us unforgettable memories. Of late, the industry has been innovating like never before, and we have been seeing a lot of themed-restaurants and other quirky experiences when enjoying our favorite meals. There are even some restaurants that are impeccably situated on elevators way above the skyscrapers, and now, we have found one that now caters to guests underwater. Welcome to Under, the first, largest, and most research-friendly underwater restaurant that has a total seating capacity of 100 guests. 

 

Image credits: Ivar Kvaal

 

 

This first of a kind experience is found in Norway and actually serves as a research hub for marine biology. The Snøhetta-designed dining experience has started operating services for all, and people are ready to add it to their destination targets. The restaurant has thick concrete walls that ensure that it withstands the pressure of the ocean and the shocks from the rugged sea conditions. You might think of it as a sunken periscope as the restaurant has a massive panoramic window that gives you a complete view of the seabed. The entire setup changes through the seasons and also adjusts to varying weather conditions. 

 

Image credits: Ivar Kvaal

 

 

“Under is a natural progression of our experimentation with boundaries,” Snøhetta Founder and Architect, Kjetil Trædal Thorsen said. “As a new landmark for Southern Norway, Under proposes unexpected combinations of pronouns and prepositions, and challenges what determines a person’s physical placement in their environment.” The place has a unique design where there are finely woven ceiling panels that provide the building with a serene ambiance. “In this modern architecture building, you may find yourself underwater, over the seabed, between land and sea. This will offer you new perspectives and ways of seeing the world, both beyond and beneath the waterline.”

 

Image credits: Ivar Kvaal

 

 

 

Image credits: Inger Marie Grini

 

 

The restaurant aspires to create a fine dining experience that is centered on high-quality, locally-sourced produce and emphasizes sustainable wildlife resources. The Head Chef of the restaurant is Danish expatriate Nicolai Ellitsgaard from the renowned restaurant Måltid in Kristiansand. He has an international, 16-person kitchen staff with experience from top Michelin restaurants. The area in Norway where the restaurant is located is well known for its intense weather conditions. It can turn from a calm day to a severe storm several times a day. Immediately upon arriving at the site, the visitors are taunted by the intense weather conditions, but when they step inside, there is a rich interior design with a warm, cozy, and welcoming atmosphere throughout the restaurant.  

 

 

Image credits: Ivar Kvaal

 

 

Furthermore, the marine research facility at the building hosts interdisciplinary research teams that study marine biology and fish behavior through cameras and other instruments. These scientists document the population, behavior, and diversity of species that live in the surrounding water-space. The goal of their program is to collect data that can be used to develop machine learning tools that monitor the population dynamics of key marine species on a regular basis. This could be implemented in many key coastal areas around the world for a more sustainable future. 

 

Image credits: Inger Marie Grini

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