×
Scientists Recreate The Face Of A 1000-Year-Old Female Viking Warrior For The First Time

Scientists Recreate The Face Of A 1000-Year-Old Female Viking Warrior For The First Time

"I'm so excited because this is a face that hasn't been seen in 1,000 years… She's suddenly become really real," said archaeologist Ella Al-Shamahi.

The first thing that comes to our mind when we think of a Viking is a fearsome, muscular man, who always carried an entire set of weapons wherever he goes. If this is the case, then you might be in for a surprise since a group of British scientists has reconstructed a war-ridden face of a 1,000-year-old female Viking warrior. 



 

 

The skeleton reportedly belongs to a warrior that was unearthed in a Viking graveyard in Solør, Norway and it is now preserved in Oslo's Museum of Cultural History.

With the remains that have been found, it has been already identified that the skeleton is that of a female and she is considered a warrior, as said by archaeologist Ella Al-Shamahi, reported The Guardian



 

 

Now, the group of scientists has reconstructed the face with the help of cutting-edge technology. As they started the reconstruction, it was discovered that she suffered from a heavy head injury that is similar to a head injury and the injury was so severe that it damaged the bone. 

It has not yet been decided if the head wound was fatal or not, but what they are certain about is the fact that she is a warrior. Al-Shamahi said, "I'm so excited because this is a face that hasn't been seen in 1,000 years… She's suddenly become really real." The expert who was behind the reconstruction is a specialist in ancient human remains and she will also be presenting a National Geographic Documentary that has featured the construction. 



 

 

With the help of advanced technology, with the muscles being anatomically worked with the help of the remaining muscles that layered her skin. The senior lecturer at the University of Dundee in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification, Dr. Caroline Erolin, who also worked on the reconstruction, said, "The resulting reconstruction is never 100 percent accurate, but is enough to generate recognition from someone who knew them well in real life."

The documentary also showed Shamahi traveling all over Scandinavia, while she is examining the burial sites of the Vikings. Not only the 1000-year-old old soldier has been reconstructed, but she is also reconstructed the woman's grave showing the placement of the weapons.

 

Twitter

 

Shamahi also added saying that even though it was a legitimate risk that any woman who was a soldier back then, would risk being overpowered when it came to hand-to-hand combat, they were pretty skilled soldiers themselves, who were completely capable of firing deadly arrows. 



 

 

Professor Neil Price, who is a Viking Expert and an archaeological consultant on the project said, "There are so many other burials in the Viking world… It wouldn't surprise me at all if we find more (female warriors)." The documentary will air on the National Geographic Channel on Tuesday 3 December at 8 pm. 

Recommended for you