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NASA Shares A Photo Of Sun Looking Like A Flaming Jack-O'-Lantern Ahead Of Halloween

NASA Shares A Photo Of Sun Looking Like A Flaming Jack-O'-Lantern Ahead Of Halloween

The photo was taken by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory which constantly monitors the Sun from its orbit in space.

With Halloween just a few days away, we have all been getting into the spooky spirit since October started. And looks like NASA has also joined in on the Halloween spirit after they shared a photo of the Sun on their Facebook account.

Interestingly enough, NASA said the Sun looked like a flaming Jack-O-Lantern’s face and that it creates a particularly Halloween-like appearance. The photo was taken in October 2014.



 

"Active regions on the sun combined to look something like a jack-o-lantern’s face on Oct. 8, 2014. The image was captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, which watches the sun at all times from its orbit in space," NASA said

"The active regions in this image appear brighter because those are areas that emit more light and energy.  They are markers of an intense and complex set of magnetic fields hovering in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona. This image blends together two sets of extreme ultraviolet wavelengths at 171 and 193 Ångströms, typically colorized in gold and yellow, to create a particularly Halloween-like appearance," it added.



 

 

The photo was taken by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory which monitors the Sun from its orbit in space. They are also inviting people to download the high-res image of the pumpkin sun, "just in time for Halloween."

Now this month of October has been rather spectacular in terms of astronomical phenomenons as well. We even noticed a "Full Hunter's Moon" that happened on 13-14th October. 

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The Full Hunter's Moon has been described as the first full moon after the Harvest Moon (aka Corn Moon), which is the last full moon before the autumnal equinox, according to South Carolina State Museum Observatory Manager Matthew Whitehouse.

"The moon will appear orange when it is near the horizon, a phenomenon that occurs because we are seeing the moon through the haze of the atmosphere", Whitehouse said. "As the moon rises above the horizon, that orange coloring will fade and it will become its more familiar white."

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We also got to see the annual Orionid meteor shower that typically happens every year in October. The meteor show was at its peak on October 21, Monday night and continued into the early hours of Tuesday, October 22.

Stargazers and the public alike got a great view of the event due to the mild temperatures of October coupled with no monsoon storms. Meteor showers are also called "shooting stars" or "falling stars." 

Did you spot them?

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