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In Pennsylvania, You Can Now Be Jailed For Leaving Your Dog Out In Extreme Weather

In Pennsylvania, You Can Now Be Jailed For Leaving Your Dog Out In Extreme Weather

The state of Pennsylvania has taken a lead in enacting what is known as the Libre's Law that makes it illegal to leave dogs chained outside longer than nine hours in a 24-hour period.

Often, dogs are at the receiving end of some very vile acts by humans. Every day there are cases after cases of abuse against these poor animals. Some of these are so harrowing that one just has to hang their head in shame at the level of sadism displayed by people.

No doubt there are now laws that fight such cruelty, but these are nowhere enough to punish the perpetrators of these acts. Many of these involve petty fines and light sentences that are nothing short of an insult to the pain and suffering of an animal.

The state of Pennsylvania has taken a lead in enacting what is known as the Libre's Law that makes it illegal to leave dogs chained outside longer than nine hours in a 24-hour period. 



 

 

It also includes making it illegal to chain a dog no longer than 30 minutes in temperatures below freezing or over 90 degrees. The law was enacted after a Boston terrier pup was found in a near-death condition in July 2016 from a Quarryville-area farm in York County clinging for its life.

He was found to be emaciated, covered in maggots and wounds. The case sparked widespread anger and leading to laws for animal abuse to be more stringent. Following this case, state lawmakers crafted new protections for animals and have now named it after the pup.



 

 

Besides the time limit for tying a dog outside, the law also has a number of other facets that deals with misdemeanors and felony charges. It also has felony charges related to anything other than animal fighting and killing an endangered species, the first of it's kind.

According to LancasterOnline, Kristen Tullo, director of the Humane Society in Pennsylvania, said an overhaul of animal cruelty laws was needed since “current laws do not carry penalties with suitable punishments for abuse, cruelty and neglect committed against animals." 



 

 

“An incredible victory for animals in Pennsylvania" is what the Pennsylvania Veterinary Medical Association called the law’s passage when it was enacted back in 2017.

“Pennsylvania was woefully behind the times in the penalties that could be assessed for severe cases of animal cruelty,” he said. “There were a lot of times we wanted to pursue serious charges against an individual but the law did not allow us to do this," said Bryan Langlois, medical director for the Pet Pantry of Lancaster County.



 

 

He added, "The new law now finally sends the message that animal abusers will not just get away with a slap on the wrist and minimal fine.” Other states do have a law against leaving animals outside for a long period of time but Libre's Law is probably the only one to recognize the harm it could do to animals especially during extreme weather conditions. Since the law was enacted there has been much awareness. 



 

 

According to Carol Hill-Evans, a Democrat from York, "I see Libre's Law as an increase of awareness to animal cruelty perpetrators and to put them on notice that this is now law, you will be arrested, you will be punished, and knock it off." 

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