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Soldiers Battling Australian Wildfires Spend Their Free Time Taking Care Of Displaced Koalas

Soldiers Battling Australian Wildfires Spend Their Free Time Taking Care Of Displaced Koalas

The men and women from the regiment nursed the koalas and gave them the required nutrients through syringes.

The soldiers of the Australian Army are risking their lives to save humans and animals alike from the Australian bushfires. Not only are these brave soldiers fighting fires, but they're also tending to the koalas who were affected because of the Australian bushfires. The soldiers from the South Australian and Tasmanian 16 Regiment Emergency Support Force visited the Cleland Wildlife Park in South Australia last Friday and nursed koalas in their spare time.



 

 

The men and women from the regiment also nursed the koalas and gave them the required nutrients through syringes. None of the volunteers had the time to change out of their uniforms and after nursing the koalas, they rushed straight back to fight the blazes in Adelaide Hills. Pictures of the volunteers were uploaded to the Australian Army Facebook page, where the soldiers were seen feeding and cradling the koalas.



 

The caption read, "A great morale boost for our hard-working team in the Adelaide Hills." Not only are the pictures absolutely heartwarming, they also show the effects of the severe bushfires that ravaged the country and put koalas in the endangered species list after many animals lost their lives or their natural habitat during the fire. 



 

Sussan Ley, an environmental scientist, commented that koalas could be listed as endangered because of the bushfire crisis. Ley also announced funding of $50 million to help the animal population of the continent to bounce back once the bushfires are contained and put out. Michael Pine, Currumbin Wildlife Hospital senior vet, advised that the injured koalas can be given water to drink but it should not be poured down their throat.



 

Pine said, "Normally, healthy koalas don't drink, but the incredibly dry conditions mean they will because they aren't getting enough fluid. As long as the koala is lapping up water and drinking by itself that's fine but forcing it into their mouth - there is a risk that koala could breathe the liquid." Original reports suggested that around 500 million animals perished because of the bushfires but new reports estimate that more than a billion animals are dead because of the bushfires. 



 

Dermot O'Gorman, WWF-Australia CEO released a statement, saying, "Australia is a land of bushfires, but this season's unprecedented mega-fires are not normal. Climate change does not cause bushfires, but it does make them much worse. This heartbreaking loss includes thousands of precious koalas on the mid-north coast of NSW, along with other iconic species such as kangaroos, wallabies, gliders, potoroos, cockatoos, and honeyeaters." 

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